Part 3. Securing a Venue & Setting a Date

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While you’re trying to nail down who to have speak, you’ll need to nail down when and where to have your event. (When you have your event will impact speaker availability.)

Lesson 8 — Before you decide on where (and when) to hold your event: Research, research, research. The last thing you want to do is plan your event while something bigger or more established is going on.

  • Contact local user groups to see if they’re planning anything or know of anything happening in your area.
  • Check out Lanyrd & Plancast to see what’s going on nearby.
  • You’ll also want to check local event calendars to see if anything else is going on near your event. Nearby events could impact parking, getting to your venue, etc.

Lesson 9 — Venues may end up costing you more than anticipated. Get as much information up front as possible.

Shop around for venues. Depending on the type of event you’re having, you might be able to find a space for free (or trade). Rentable event space isn’t cheap. Reach out to local universities, libraries, businesses and see if any of them have space you could use first. If you have to pay for a venue, know that costs can and will fluctuate. Sound, lighting, labor: the costs quickly pile up.

  • Make sure they’re available on the day you want to hold your event.
  • Review contracts, rules and regulations closely.
  • Don’t sign or agree to anything without having others involved in your event review them first.
  • Don’t assume the cost you’re given is fixed unless it is explicitly indicated as such.
  • If you’re a first-timer, the venue may require up-front payment to secure your reservation.

Other questions you might want to ask a potential venue:

  • Are they willing to waive whole or part of rental fee in exchange for sponsorship? (Don’t be afraid to ask. They might say yes.)
  • Is parking readily available? Is it free?
  • Is wi-fi available? Can they handle X number of attendees?
  • When can you begin setting up?
  • Have they ever hosted an event like yours before? (Get what details you can. You might be able to track down that organizer and get their opinions on the venue.
  • Do they have an A/V system you can hook into? (If not, you may need to rent a screen, projector, sound system, etc.)
  • Do you have to use the venue for catering/concessions? (Some may have stipulations for a concession guarantee or charge a fee if you bring in outside goods. Some may outright prohibit outside food.)
  • Is event insurance required? Even if it’s not, I’d highly recommend looking into getting a policy. I used EventHelper.com and coverage for our event ran less that $130. If something were to happen to the venue you’re using, or an attendee was hurt, you could be held personally liable. That’s a bad thing. Trust me.