Suitcase for Windows Released

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Well, it finally happened: Extensis released a new version of Suitcase for Windows today. I’ve been hoping for an update for quite some time, and the day I complained about it – a new version was announced.From the Manage This blog, here are some of the new features:

Updated Suitcase Server client When serialized properly, Suitcase for Windows is an updated client for a Suitcase Server. It can also be used in a stand alone, or single-user capacity, if desired.Microsoft Vista™ compatibility – We are now compatible with the 32-bit version of Vista, as well as Windows XP and 2000.Automatic font activation plug-ins – Through the use of plug-ins, fonts can be automatically activated when a document is opened. We provide activation plug-ins for the most common creative applications, including Adobe InDesign CS2, Illustrator CS2 and QuarkXPress 7.The Font Vault – When used in a single-user or stand alone capacity, users can take advantage of the new Font Vault. Basically, this is a secure repository in which Suitcase for Windows can store all of your fonts. This keeps all of your fonts in a single location, rather than all over your hard disk.

Once I’ve used the new version, I’ll try to post a more thorough review.

13 thoughts on “Suitcase for Windows Released

  1. With all the awesome open source software currently available and in development, I don’t understand why there are so few typeface/font management/selection utilities.

    Suitcase may be a wonderful program, but $100 is two or three times what I’m willing to pay for _any_ feature set in this category.

    So far, I’ve been muddling along with The Font Thing, and a typeface selection template cobbled together in OpenOffice.

    The Mac guys rave about Linotype’s free Font Explorer X. It sounds perfect, but why is a Windows version taking so long?

  2. Adobe Type Manager Light is the only “free” font manager that I know of… And it is more than a little ridiculous that it’s been over a year since a Windows version of the Font Explorer X was announced and it still hasn’t materialized. (I don’t care if it is going to be free.)

    I agree that $99 for Extensis Suitcase might seem like a bit much. (I’m able to get the upgrade since I’ve had the full version for a while now, and the $49 is a bit easier to swallow.) But if having a reliable app to manage fonts is important enough to you, the cost is negligible.

  3. I don’t know how much “management” I need, because I just install everything from Windows Explorer. With several hundred font files, I haven’t noticed any problems or slow performance.

    Usually, I’m trying to (i) select a particular typeface for a design, or (i) select a second typeface that will complement another.

    (i) The Font Thing allows me to build “virtual font collections” such as “script”, “titling”, “Client ABC” and see a phrase in all fonts, all serifs, all sans-serifs, or just in the “Client ABC” collection.

    (ii) For the second task, I just throw the phrase in several fonts into an OpenOffice document. It just feels kludgy. ::sigh::

    Can we sign a petition requesting Font Explorer X Win??

  4. “Font Explorer X was announced and it still hasn’t materialized. (I don’t care if it is going to be free.)”

    Agreed. I’d pay $20 for Font Explorer X Win today, probably on reputation alone.

  5. The main benefit of a program like Suitcase is the auto-activation. I can drop a font into it, activate it, and it’s immediately available in open applications. By simply dropping fonts into the C:WINDOWSFONTS folder, you usually have to close any open apps before the new typefaces become available for use. The ability to build collections is another thing Suitcase does… And you can preview multiple fonts at once with custom text…

    As for whether it would be worth $20 for a Linotype app on Windows? I dunno… Considering their desire to have it act as an iTunes for Fonts… I couldn’t justify spending money on it to use it. I’d feel (somewhat) obligated to buy fonts every now and then…

  6. With all the awesome open source software currently available and in development, I don’t understand why there are so few typeface/font management/selection utilities.

    Suitcase may be a wonderful program, but $100 is two or three times what I’m willing to pay for _any_ feature set in this category.

    So far, I’ve been muddling along with The Font Thing, and a typeface selection template cobbled together in OpenOffice.

    The Mac guys rave about Linotype’s free Font Explorer X. It sounds perfect, but why is a Windows version taking so long?

  7. I’m surprised as well, about the lack of open source alternatives for font management. Aside from the Linotype Font Explorer X app you mentioned, Adobe Type Manager Light is the only “free” font manager that I know of… And it is more than a little ridiculous that it’s been over a year since a Windows version of the Font Explorer X was announced and it still hasn’t materialized. (I don’t care if it is going to be free.)

    I agree that $99 for Extensis Suitcase might seem like a bit much. (I’m able to get the upgrade since I’ve had the full version for a while now, and the $49 is a bit easier to swallow.) But if having a reliable app to manage fonts is important enough to you, the cost is negligible.

  8. I don’t know how much “management” I need, because I just install everything from Windows Explorer. With several hundred font files, I haven’t noticed any problems or slow performance.

    Usually, I’m trying to (i) select a particular typeface for a design, or (i) select a second typeface that will complement another.

    (i) The Font Thing allows me to build “virtual font collections” such as “script”, “titling”, “Client ABC” and see a phrase in all fonts, all serifs, all sans-serifs, or just in the “Client ABC” collection.

    (ii) For the second task, I just throw the phrase in several fonts into an OpenOffice document. It just feels kludgy. ::sigh::

    Can we sign a petition requesting Font Explorer X Win??

  9. “Font Explorer X was announced and it still hasn’t materialized. (I don’t care if it is going to be free.)”

    Agreed. I’d pay $20 for Font Explorer X Win today, probably on reputation alone.

  10. The main benefit of a program like Suitcase is the auto-activation. I can drop a font into it, activate it, and it’s immediately available in open applications. By simply dropping fonts into the C:\WINDOWS\FONTS\ folder, you usually have to close any open apps before the new typefaces become available for use. The ability to build collections is another thing Suitcase does… And you can preview multiple fonts at once with custom text…

    As for whether it would be worth $20 for a Linotype app on Windows? I dunno… Considering their desire to have it act as an iTunes for Fonts… I couldn’t justify spending money on it to use it. I’d feel (somewhat) obligated to buy fonts every now and then…

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